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\n \n The Magic of Synergy <\/a>\n <\/h3>\n \n \n \n \n
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The Magic of Synergy<\/h3>\r\n

I have to think that people who downplay the importance of synergy haven\u2019t experienced its magic. I hope that\u2019s not you.<\/p>\r\n

Synergy says everyone is smarter than any one. It makes sense. You know things I don\u2019t. I know things you don\u2019t. Together we cover more bases. Likewise, you know things your exec doesn\u2019t. Your exec knows things you don\u2019t. You have different perceptions, skills and focal points. That can be a recipe for synergy.<\/p>\r\n

In The Marshmallow Challenge, Ted Wujek explains that CEOs did much better on the exercise when their admins were on their teams. He suggests the characteristic admin focus on process augments the CEO planning bias. The combined styles create synergy.<\/p>\r\n <\/div>\n \n \n \n \n \n Read more <\/a>\n \n \n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n<\/div>\n\n

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\n \n The Power of Being at Home With Yourself <\/a>\n <\/h3>\n \n \n \n \n
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Persona and Personhood<\/h3>\r\n

I love to hear feedback after I speak. This recent comment really struck me:<\/p>\r\n

\"During your talk, I turned to the gal sitting next to me and told her: 'Meryl just said the opposite of what the speaker before her said.'\"<\/p>\r\n

\"Thanks for noticing!\" I replied smiling. \"From the moment I heard the title of the keynote that I would follow, I expected we would say different things.\u201d The keynote I followed was called \u201cCultivating a Leadership Persona.\u201d<\/p>\r\n

\u201cI've spent most of my adult years working to drop persona and be the real deal,\" I explained. My new friends nodded approvingly and knowingly.<\/p>\r\n

It used to bother me that my perspective often is very different from others'. It doesn't bother me anymore. I\u2019ve become more at home with myself. I see things differently without needing to discredit how others view then. The speaker before me made some important points and offered useful tools. I offered some alterative views.<\/p>\r\n <\/div>\n \n \n \n \n \n Read more <\/a>\n \n \n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n<\/div>\n\n

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\n \n When a Manager Lies <\/a>\n <\/h3>\n \n \n \n \n
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Stanford study tells how to spot a CEO who lies <\/h3>\r\n

A recent Stanford study pinpointed communication tendencies that are common among CEOs who are later proven to be liars. Here\u2019s what it said:<\/p>\r\n

\u201cFor one, they seldom referred to themselves or their firms in the first person; \u201cI\u201d and \u201cwe\u201d were replaced by terms like \u201cthe team\u201d and \u201cthe company.\u201d Deceitful executives passed up humdrum adjectives like \u201csolid\u201d and \u201crespectable\u201d in favor of gushing words like \u201cfantastic,\u201d and (not surprisingly) they seldom mentioned shareholder value.<\/p>\r\n

They also tended buttress their points with references to general knowledge with phrases like \u201cyou know\u201d and to make short statements with little hesitation, presumably because they had carefully scripted the untruths in advance and had no interest in lingering on them.\u201d<\/p>\r\n

The report also noted the tendency to swear as a tip off. <\/p>\r\n

The study lead to the question that a woman\u2019s magazine editor asked me: \"How do you get to the truth when bosses lie?\"
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\n \n A Sophisticated Vocabulary of Feelings <\/a>\n <\/h3>\n \n \n \n \n
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When you embark on an important conversation, do you know how you feel? Most people don't. When I ask what they feel, most people will share an opinion. There's power in the language of feelings. Find the words to describe how you feel, and you are far more likely to make a powerful point.Learn how to use your communication words in:How to Use PowerPhrases<\/a><\/p>\r\n <\/div>\n \n \n \n \n \n Read more <\/a>\n \n \n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n<\/div>\n\n

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\n \n Emotional Alchemy through the "Love Letter" <\/a>\n <\/h3>\n \n \n \n \n
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The Love Letter Technique<\/h1>\r\n

According to Relationship Expert John Gray, emotions exist in layers, from
more guarded to more vulnerable. Emotions go from:<\/p>\r\n

1. Anger
2. Sorrow
3. Fear
4. Regret
5. Love<\/h5>\r\n

If you\u2019re ever unsure about what you feel, use this like a map to take you through all possible levels. Gray calls it a love letter technique. That name implies that you only use it in love relationships \u2014 but it\u2019s useful any time you\u2019re not sure what you feel. The process has helped me through many emotional challenges.<\/p>\r\n

Here are some sentence stems to help you work your way through your emotions.<\/p>\r\n <\/div>\n \n \n \n \n \n Read more <\/a>\n \n \n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n<\/div>\n\n

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\n \n Find the HEART of Effective Business Communication #1: Honesty matters. Honest it does! <\/a>\n <\/h3>\n \n \n \n \n
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Everyone knows honesty is the best policy - and yet there are so many ways we have been taught and encouraged to be dishonest. Character-based Communicators embrace honesty because it's right, freeing and effective. <\/p>\r\n <\/div>\n \n \n \n \n \n Read more <\/a>\n \n \n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n<\/div>\n\n

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\n \n Find the HEART of Effective Business Communication #2: Eloquence. Every word matters. <\/a>\n <\/h3>\n \n \n \n \n
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Eloquence is the second quality at the hEart of Character-based Communication. It's not enough to be right or know what you're talking about. You also need to speak with grace, skill and polish. <\/p>\r\n <\/div>\n \n \n \n \n \n Read more <\/a>\n \n \n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n<\/div>\n\n